Creationist Kids Subvert the Bible

The kids are alright.  That’s the conclusion, anyway, of the Happy Atheist PZ Myers.

Myers took a tour of a recent creationist science fair.  What did he find?  Creationist kids seem to be using the tools of creationist parents against them.

Myers went to the smallish Twin Cities creationist science fair.  Most of the student presentations, he found, seemed like regular science with just a required Bible verse appended.  And that combination, Myers argued, undercut the intended creationist brain-washing of these young Minnesotans.

One student seemed to be comparing the absorbency of diapers to the spiritual absorbency of Jesus.  Another seemed to disprove her Bible verse by feeding a wild bird out of her hand.

Myers’ conclusion:

Whether they like it or not, these kids are being given the tools to kick their tired Christian ideology to the curb.

 

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6 Comments

  1. Agellius

     /  February 18, 2014

    “Whether they like it or not, these kids are being given the tools to kick their tired Christian ideology to the curb.”

    This assumes that science is capable of disproving Christian “ideology”. It also admits that Christian schools understand what science is and are teaching real science.

    Reply
    • Agellius, I think, too, that conservative Protestants have an intellectual Achilles’ heel that conservative Catholics don’t share. When and if they feel alienated from mainstream intellectual or popular culture, Catholics can delve into their incredibly rich history of doctrinal and philosophical discussions. I’ve heard from a few people raised by conservative evangelical parents who’ve told me that their parents’ insistence on “counter-cultural” education (i.e., you children are Christian, expect to feel alienated from mainstream American culture) has had the unintended result of making the children skeptical of all authority, including that of their parents’ religion. This is just a hunch, but it seems to me conservative Catholics will have a much easier time of pointing children to firmly established counter-cultural intellectual traditions that will not have the same unintended result.

      Reply
  2. Agellius

     /  February 19, 2014

    “I’ve heard from a few people raised by conservative evangelical parents who’ve told me that their parents’ insistence on “counter-cultural” education (i.e., you children are Christian, expect to feel alienated from mainstream American culture) has had the unintended result of making the children skeptical of all authority, including that of their parents’ religion.”

    I don’t quite follow the reasoning here. However, I do agree that distrust of authority is a trait of Protestantism generally, based on the doctrine of total depravity, i.e. we’re all fallen and corrupted in our reason and in our wills, therefore trust no one but only trust the Bible.

    “This is just a hunch, but it seems to me conservative Catholics will have a much easier time of pointing children to firmly established counter-cultural intellectual traditions that will not have the same unintended result.”

    I agree and I’m surprised and impressed that you are cognizant of that. : )

    Reply
    • I worked at a Jesuit high school for many years. It seemed as if the priests were always able to point students toward various elements from the tradition, to bolster whatever idea or position the priest thought valuable.

      Reply
  3. lumi

     /  February 19, 2014

    This reminds me of blogger Libby Anne (lovejoyfeminism), whose family and church made creationism such an important tenet of faith that when that was knocked down, all the rest of it followed. Others have spoken of participating in debates, with the point being that teaching kids critical thinking often leads them to critically think about their religion and ultimately reject at least parts of it.

    Reply
  1. A Trip to a Catholic-School Science Fair | I Love You but You're Going to Hell

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