I Love You but You Didn’t Do the Reading

Two big anniversaries this week and a whole lot of other stuff, too. Welcome to our weekly review of ILYBYGTH-themed stories from around the interwebs:

“How do we have a safe conversation about unsafe ideas?” Using biology class to fight racism, at NYT.

Utah Congressman introduces new LGBTQ discrimination law, at CT.

The law would prohibit anti-LGBT discrimination in employment, housing, and places of public accommodation, including retail stores, banks, and health care service providers. Currently, under federal law and in the majority of states, LGBT people can be evicted from rental property, denied loans, denied medical care, fired from their jobs, and turned away from businesses because of their sexual orientation. . . . The Fairness for All Act exempts religious groups—both churches and nonprofits—from the anti-discrimination rules. . . . The anti-discrimination rules would not apply to for-profit businesses with 14 or fewer employees, excluding them from the definition of “public accommodation.”

chris stewart CT

Okay, so here’s the deal: No one can discriminate against LGBTQ people, unless they REALLY want to…

At what point does kooky political conspiracy theory become legally insane? At NYT.

“You’ve got a real, real tradition of insanity defense cases of very, very seriously mentally ill people who committed their crime out of some kind of utterly bizarre political motivation,” he said.

Embracing charters = embracing Queen Betsy, at WaPo.

To embrace charter schools in 2020 is to embrace Betsy DeVos, Donald Trump and other Republicans who stand to gain more politically from charter support than black communities have gained in jobs and educational benefits.

Gay pizzazz at George Fox University: RNS.

George Fox spokesman Rob Felton noted that the university already dedicates a section of its website to “Supporting LGBTQ students at George Fox.” It affirms the “dignity of every person” and calls for civility and “better communication,” but maintains that “God has intended sexual relations to be reserved for marriage between a man and a woman.”

“This is a hard and emotional issue,” Felton told RNS in an email. “It is not an ‘us versus them’ issue, it’s a ‘we’ issue. It’s personal for everyone involved. George Fox students come from various faith traditions so we understand that they may hold different views on LGBTQ issues.”

Why do nice Christians love Trump? A new insider look at RS.

[Trump] affirmed and evangelized the belief that it is not only acceptable but actually advisable to grant cultural dominance to one particular religious group. . . . “I don’t think he’s godly, Alex,” my aunt tells me. “I just think he stands up for Christians. Trump’s a fighter. He’s done more for the Christian right than Reagan or Bush. I’m just so thankful we’ve got somebody that’s saying Christians have rights too.”

What does it mean to be “evangelical?” NT Wright takes a crack at an explanation at the Atlantic.

I’ve taken the view that the word evangelical is far too good a word to let the crazy guys have it all to themselves, just like I think the word Catholic is far too good a word for the Romans to keep it all to themselves. And while we’re at it, the word liberal is too good a word for the skeptics to have it all for themselves. It stands for freedom of thought and exploration.

New international test scores are out. The USA doesn’t look so good, at NYT.

It starts by tapping into the universal anxiety about the future. . . . [but] there is no evidence to justify, let alone prove, the claim that PISA indeed measures skills that are essential for life in modern economies.

A different kind of school “choice” helps richer, whiter areas resegregate their schools, at Forbes.

In recent years, another approach has appeared–the splinter district. These occur when a community aims to secede from their current district; these new districts frequently adopt a new border that corresponds to racial and/or economic borders–a sort of school district gerrymandering. It’s white flight, without the actual flight.

nat geo pearl harbor mapPearl Harbor remembered:

nat geo attack viewThe other anniversary this week–Fifty years after Altamont, at HNN:

In what was to become, quite literally, a fatal mistake, the event organizers hired the Hells Angels motorcycle gang to serve as security guards. As noted in Joel Selvin’s book, Altamont, the biker group was hired (for $500 worth of beer) on the recommendation of Rock Scully, the Grateful Dead’s manager.

Today, the event is remembered by the shocking images of violence that occurred at the climax of the concert, as the Rolling Stones took the stage surrounded by Hells Angels. As the drug-fueled young men and women in the crowd surged forward, the leather-jacketed gang members beat many senseless with pool cues and motorcycle chains. Dozens were taken to the hospital and one young black man was stabbed to death.

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