Is It “Bigotry” to Leave Religious Schools Out?

Don’t believe the hype. If you’ve been following the Espinoza v. Montana case, you’ve likely heard the argument that Montana’s constitutional prohibition against funding religious schools is rooted solely in old anti-Catholic bigotry. In order to understand why that’s not an adequate argument, we need to understand the 19th-century distinction between a “sectarian” school and a “religious” school.IJ BlaineFirst, a little background: The Espinoza case resulted from the desire of parents to use state vouchers to send their children to religious schools. Montana has a “baby Blaine” line in its constitution forbidding any funding of religious schools. The plaintiffs contend that these rules are discriminatory. If states fund any private schools, the argument goes, they cannot exclude religious schools simply because they are religious.

The Blaine Amendment itself failed. It was an attempt to change the US Constitution to prohibit tax funding for “sectarian” schools. The language was taken up by states, however, and inserted into dozens of state constitutions, including Montana’s. The original 1875 language proposed the following:

No state shall make any law respecting an establishment of religion or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; and no money raised by taxation in any state for the support of public schools, or derived from any public fund therefore, nor any public lands devoted thereto, shall ever be under the control of any religious sect, nor shall any money so raised or lands so devoted be divided between religious sects or denominations.

Back in the 1870s, the biggest “sect or denomination” that was competing for tax funding was the growing Catholic Church. For that reason, some conservative activists claim these constitutional amendments are rooted in “anti-Catholic bigotry.” An activist legal group, the Institute for Justice, represents the plaintiffs in this case. As they put it,

Blaine Amendments are controversial state constitutional provisions rooted in 19th century anti-Catholic bigotry. Their purpose was to prevent the government from funding Catholic schools. Today, opponents of educational choice employ Blaine Amendments—found in 37 state constitutions—as blunt weapons with which they attempt to block modern educational choice programs.

The argument has been around for a while. In 2000, Justice Clarence Thomas signaled his agreement that baby-Blaine amendments were merely crude anti-Catholicism. As Thomas wrote,

Consideration of the [Blaine] amendment arose at a time of pervasive hostility to the Catholic Church and to Catholics in general, and it was an open secret that “sectarian” was code for “Catholic.”

And that’s the rub. To our ears, the word “sectarian” has lost its old meaning. When we talk about “religious” schools, we generally mean something very different from what Americans generally meant in the 1870s or 1810s. To make sense of the history being bandied about in today’s argument, we need to understand the ways people used the term “sectarian” back in the 1800s.

So, first, were Blaine amendments anti-Catholic? Well, yes. They were rooted in ugly post-war politics of race and religion. Back then, Democrats accused Republicans of being “soft” on white supremacy. And Republicans accused Democrats of being “soft” on Protestant supremacy. In this race to the bottom, Republicans like Blaine hoped to bolster their political careers by appearing to be “hard” on Protestant supremacy, even though Blaine himself came from a Catholic family. (It’s complicated.)

But was “sectarian” simply code for “Catholic?” No. The politics of the Blaine amendments were more complicated than that. For decades, public schools had been evolving toward something similar to the way they are today.

One big difference back then was that all public schools were far more “religious” than they are today. It was typical and expected (and often legally required) that school would start with a teacher-led prayer and that students would read from the Bible in a devotional way.

Throughout the 19th century, public leaders generally agreed that public schools should be religious in that way, but not “sectarian.” What did they mean by “sectarian?” In short, “sectarian” meant any religious practice that was not commonly shared among Protestant groups. “Sectarian” meant teaching a certain denominational belief, such as Calvinism or Arminianism. “Sectarian” meant teaching any controversial religious idea, such as adult or child baptism. And accusations of “sectarianism” tended to be biased against a lot of different religious groups, including Catholics, but also Quakers, Seventh-day Adventists, Mormons/LDS, and many others.

Maybe a few examples from my current research will help illustrate the 19th-century distinction. As cities such as Philadelphia and New York set up their first public schools in the early 1800s, this distinction between “religious” (as we know it) and “sectarian” (as they thought of it) was usually considered too obvious to be spelled out. It was assumed that all public schools would actively teach generic Christian religion, but that none of them would promote any “sectarian” idea.

Adelphi religionConsider, for example, the policy of the Adelphi School in Philadelphia at the start of the century. All students were exhorted to follow basic rules of Christian morality and “strive to be good children by loving [their] HEAVENLY FATHER.” The school founders told parents—without seeing any contradiction—that the school would not teach any religion. It would only instruct the children in reading the Bible and following “Christian morality.”

In New York, too, the Free School Society assumed its public schools would be full of religion, but devoid of sectarianism. What was the distinction? They claimed their board of trustees in 1814 included men from “nearly every religious denomination.” They carefully tallied up their students’ religious preferences, including 271 Presbyterians, 186 Episcopalians, 172 Methodists, 119 Baptists, 41 “Dutch church,” and 9 Roman Catholics. Every student read from the Bible every day in school, and on Tuesday mornings all students were pulled out of school to attend catechism classes at their church of choice.

The distinction that mattered in the 19th century was that “sectarian” education would never receive tax funding. The guiding principle was that tax dollars would not pay to teach children specific religious ideas that were not generally shared. As public thinking about religion and public education evolved over the twentieth century, the difficulties of defining a “sectarian” idea led US courts—including SCOTUS—to rule that public schools had to exclude more and more religious practice. In the 1960s, SCOTUS ruled that ecumenical prayers and Bible-reading were too religious for public schools, meaning they were not beyond controversy. Some students didn’t want to pray or read from the Bible. There was no such thing, 20th-century SCOTUS decided, as “non-sectarian” religious practices.

The distinction has a long history: Public schools have always been expected to avoid any controversial religious teaching. They have been expected to avoid—in 19th-century terms—any “sectarian” indoctrination.

What does that mean for Espinoza? Are the plaintiffs correct that they should receive tax funding for their religious schools? No. Not if SCOTUS wants to respect the two-century-old precedent of American public education. The general goal of public schools when it comes to religion is to avoid using tax money to pay for any controversial doctrine, any “sectarian” idea. And that is precisely the goal of Ms. Espinoza and the Institute for Justice.

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9 Comments

  1. Agellius

     /  January 26, 2020

    So you’re saying the idea is to avoid funding controversial or “sectarian” doctrines, and that it’s not an anti-religious stance per se, right? How about the doctrine that gender has nothing to do with physical sex? Or that homosexual relations are no better or worse than heterosexual relations? Being controversial, don’t those fall under the ban? If not, why not?

    Reply
    • Good point. Let me please clarify that I was trying to identify the dominant trend in American thinking about the proper role of religion in public schools, not explaining my opinion about the proper role of religion in public schools.
      As to your specific point about gender and sexuality, I think you’ve put your finger on a great example. From what I can tell, the thing that drives some religious conservative intellectuals totally bonkers is the fact that their ideas about gender and sexuality are now outside the pale of non-divisive thinking. Rod Dreher, for example. In other words, conservatives hate the fact that their ideas about traditional sexuality and gender are now put in the category of “sectarian” or “divisive” thinking by some public-school advocates.
      FWIW, it was exactly the same situation a hundred years ago for some anti-evolution conservatives. Leaders such as William Jennings Bryan could not stand the idea that their religious ideas had been shunted off to the status of a “sectarian” or “controversial” religious idea, no longer worth including in mainstream, non-sectarian public schools.
      So, in most cases, mainstream opinion about gender and sexuality has shifted rapidly, and opposing same-sex marriage or gender fluidity are no longer included in the non-controversial mainstream.

      Reply
      • Agellius

         /  January 26, 2020

        Are you saying transgenderism is considered non-controversial? That’s what really gets my goat. If a majority decides to teach transgenderism by vote, or whatever, that’s just something I have to swallow as the price of living in a democracy. But to argue that it should be taught or allowed to be taught because it’s non-controversial is downright orwellian.

        To answer my own question above, these controversial positions avoid the ban for the reason that they’re non-religious positions; whereas opposition to them is considered religious. Therefore the religious position is excluded specifically because it’s religious. How is that not anti-religious bias?

        The answer doesn’t have to be to teach that transgenderism is immoral. I totally understand why that could be problematic: There’s no (longer) societal consensus as to its morality and normality. But teaching that it’s moral and normal and good is every bit as problematic, and for the exact same reason. If you’re going to ban our view for that reason then you damn well better ban the opposing view as well, that is, leave it out of the curriculum entirely.

  2. This morning I read an article (see here) that made me laugh, because it relayed a story about a cardinal in the Catholic Church who doesn’t seem to understand some very basic terms. He suggested that Catholics who protest some actions of the pope ought to become Protestants, because that’s what they essentially are. I couldn’t contain myself. I laughed so hard I nearly spilled my coffee. What made this story particularly funny to me was that just yesterday I had an email exchange with a Protestant about this very same topic. Our exchange was cordial and intelligent, unlike the rhetoric I see coming from liberal clergy in the Catholic Church these days. Without getting into the details of the exchange itself, or delving too deeply into the problems with the cardinal’s assertion, I think it’s time to go through some basic terminology.

    Terms are important because they mean something, and if we use the wrong terms, we tend to create more problems than we solve. I point the finger at myself on this one. I’m guilty of it too, from time to time, especially when I get a little hot-headed. So let’s go into the terms that need to be reviewed and clarified…

    CHRISTIAN: A Christian is any person who has received a Trinitarian baptism. Trinitarian baptisms, done in the “Name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit” are essentially Catholic baptisms, and are fully recognized by the Catholic Church as 100% valid. A Trinitarian baptism performed in a Baptist Church (for example) is just as “Catholic” as one performed in the Catholic Church. This is why candidates from Protestantism are not “re-baptized” upon entering the Catholic Church. Their baptisms in their Protestant churches are considered fully valid and Catholic. What Protestants usually lack are the sacraments of Reconciliation, Confirmation and Holy Eucharist, as well as a Catholic profession of faith. However, their baptisms are fully Catholic. So, in review, a Trinitarian baptism is a Catholic baptism, and that’s what makes you a Christian. It all starts there. Essentially, a Christian is a baptized Catholic, but that doesn’t mean a Christian will remain Catholic.
    CATHOLIC: A Catholic is any person who has received a Trinitarian baptism, as well as the sacraments of Confirmation and Eucharist in the Catholic Church, and is in communion with the Bishop of Rome (Pope), as evidenced by accepting all the teachings of the Catholic Church (a profession of faith). This is important. What makes you a Catholic is not just the sacraments or saying you’re in communion with the Pope. These things are part of it, but the real key is accepting all the teachings of the Catholic Church. One can be an active Catholic, or a lapsed Catholic, but so long as one still accepts the teachings of the Catholic Church, one is still Catholic.
    PROTESTANT: A Protestant is any person who has received Trinitarian baptism and still believes in the Trinity (making him/her technically a “baptized Catholic” or “Christian”), but who simultaneously rejects some or most of the teachings of the Catholic Church. This is the very definition of the word “Protestant” which means “one who protests.” The word “protest” is written right into the word “PROTESTant.” This is important, because a Protestant is always a “baptized Catholic” or “Christian,” meaning one who received a Trinitarian baptism and still believes in the Trinity, but rejects other Catholic teachings. It doesn’t really matter what these teachings are. It could be teachings about the Pope, Eucharist, Saints, Purgatory, or such things as artificial contraception, abortion, homosexuality, same-sex “marriage,” and female ordination. If one “protests” Catholic teaching on these things, one ceases to be Catholic and becomes PROTESTant.
    Understanding these terms is important. This is why Mormons and Jehovah’s Witnesses are not Protestants. They’re not Protestants because they don’t have Trinitarian (Catholic) baptism. They reject the teaching of the Trinity, and they don’t baptize in the Name of the Trinity. Therefore, they lack a proper Catholic baptism. This means they’re not technically Christians either, in a doctrinal sense, because as the definition of the word “Christian” above states: “A Christian is any person who has received a Trinitarian (Catholic) baptism” and professes faith in the Trinitarian God. There are basically only three types of Christians in the world…

    CATHOLIC — A validly baptized person who accepts the teachings of the Catholic Church and submits to the authority of the Pope.
    ORTHODOX — A validly baptized person who accepts the teachings of the Catholic Church but does not submit to the authority of the Pope. This is known as schism.
    PROTESTANT — A validly baptized person who does not accept the teachings of the Catholic Church. This is known as heresy. And does not submit to the authority of the Pope. This is known as schism.
    So Orthodox Christians are basically Catholics who are in schism with the pope. While Protestant Christians are basically Catholics who “protest” Catholic teaching (heresy) and are also in schism with the pope.

    Understanding this is important when dealing with Orthodox and Protestant Christians. While Orthodox Christians usually know the Catholic Church accepts their Trinitarian baptisms as fully valid and “Catholic,” most Protestants are completely unaware of this. Pointing it out to them can be an ice-breaker. For example; when a Protestant says “I’ll never be Catholic,” a good comeback can be: “Technically you already are at some level. You’ve received a Catholic baptism, and the Catholic Church recognizes that. So it’s like you’ve already got your foot in the door. That Trinitarian baptism ties you to the Catholic Church like a boat moored to a dock. You can’t leave the Catholic Church entirely unless you cut the mooring of your Trinitarian baptism, but if you do that you’ll cease to be Christian as well.”

    As you can imagine, a comeback like that throws them on their heels. The concept of being connected, or tied, to the Catholic Church probably never occurred to them before. Now depending on how anti-Catholic they are, they may or may not accept this. But it doesn’t matter. The seed has been planted, and if it doesn’t sprout in their minds, it might sprout in others who overheard it.

    This is an important clarification that came out of the Second Vatican Council, but Vatican II did not invent it. It was taught prior to the council, by popes and bishops, and even in some catechisms. But it wasn’t clearly defined until the Second Vatican Council. I know some Catholics have a problem with Vatican II, and truth be told, I have some minor problems with it too. But I’m not in the habit of throwing the baby out with the bathwater. I interpret Vatican II within the Hermeneutic of Continuity, as Pope Paul VI and Pope Benedict XVI taught us. There is no other valid interpretation of Vatican II. It must be in continuity with the historical Church, and this teaching about Protestants and baptism is.

    docked
    Docked and Berthed Boats

    If we think of the Catholic Church like a dock, then Catholics are those people freely walking up and down the dock on to shore. Orthodox Christians are like boats fully docked to the dock, like being berthed in a boat slip, tied on all corners and secured. While Protestant Christians are moored to the dock, tied on one end (usually by the bow of the boat), to a post on the dock. The stern of the boat may move about, and be unsecured, but the boat is still tied (moored), at least on one end, to something on the dock, or something connected to the dock. The connection is real and it is secure. The boat may move about much more than one that is fully docked or berthed, but it’s still attached to the dock.

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
    A Moored Boat: One Rope Attached to Dock

    This is the situation Protestants find themselves in. The Catholic Church is like a dock. Protestants are attached to the Catholic Church by the Sacrament of Trinitarian Baptism, like a rope, which is what the Catholic Church herself recognizes as initiation into the Catholic Church. But at the same time, these Protestants refuse to be connected to the Catholic Church in any other way. The only way they can be truly independent and free of Rome is to cut the “rope” of Trinitarian baptism that ties them to the “dock” of the Catholic Church. But if they do that, they cease to be Christian entirely, and are no different than Mormons or Jehovah’s Witnesses. It’s quite a pickle, actually, especially for those Protestants who happen to be very anti-Catholic. They hate the dock. They curse the dock. They may even spit on the dock. Yet they are tied to the dock whether they like it or not, and they cannot leave unless they give up their faith in the Trinity.

    Giving this illustration to Protestants helps them better understand their relationship to the Catholic Church, as well as their dependence upon it. This is how we can better understand the Catholic teaching of extra Ecclesiam nulla salus or “outside the Church there is no salvation.” Protestants are indeed connected to the Catholic Church, even if it’s just by one “rope” so to speak, which is Trinitarian baptism, but their loose affiliation puts them in a very precarious and vulnerable position, subject to the waves and storms of life. They would be better off fully docked or berthed like the Orthodox, or better yet, walking freely on the dock itself as a Catholic. As the Universal Catechism of St. John Paul II teaches…

    “Outside the Church there is no salvation”

    846 How are we to understand this affirmation, often repeated by the Church Fathers? Re-formulated positively, it means that all salvation comes from Christ the Head through the Church which is his Body:

    Basing itself on Scripture and Tradition, the Council teaches that the Church, a pilgrim now on earth, is necessary for salvation: the one Christ is the mediator and the way of salvation; he is present to us in his body which is the Church. He himself explicitly asserted the necessity of faith and Baptism, and thereby affirmed at the same time the necessity of the Church which men enter through Baptism as through a door. Hence they could not be saved who, knowing that the Catholic Church was founded as necessary by God through Christ, would refuse either to enter it or to remain in it.

    838 “The Church knows that she is joined in many ways to the baptized who are honored by the name of Christian, but do not profess the Catholic faith in its entirety or have not preserved unity or communion under the successor of Peter.” Those “who believe in Christ and have been properly baptized are put in a certain, although imperfect, communion with the Catholic Church.” With the Orthodox Churches, this communion is so profound “that it lacks little to attain the fullness that would permit a common celebration of the Lord’s Eucharist.”

    These highlighted statements in Catechism 846 & 838 is a direct reference to Protestants who have received Trinitarian baptism. Their baptism is essentially “Catholic” in every sense, and they have therefore been initiated into the Catholic Church, but their initiation is incomplete because they “protest” Catholic teaching. Thus, a Protestant is a baptized Catholic who protests Catholic teaching.

    What made me laugh about the cardinal’s statement in the referenced article above was that he equated Protestantism with protest of a man or his actions, rather than protesting doctrine. It causes me to question if the cardinal understands what the word “Protestant” actually means.

    I spent the first 30 years of my life in Protestantism. I think I know a thing or two about it. My Protestantism was based on doctrine, always on doctrine, and never on people. I never had a problem with the person of Pope St. John Paul II. I always thought he was a pretty cool guy. When he kissed the Koran that one time, I thought “well, that’s weird” and he really shouldn’t have done it, but I basically ignored it. My separation from Rome was never contingent on what any pope did or didn’t do. Frankly, I didn’t care. My schism with Rome was based on things like Purgatory, Prayer to Saints, Mary, the Eucharist, and Faith vs. Works. I really didn’t give a hoot about the Pope and what he did or didn’t do.

    I know many Protestants who absolutely LOVE Pope Francis, and think he’s the greatest thing since the invention of the printing press, but they still protest Catholic doctrine on the Saints, Purgatory, Eucharist, etc. Does that mean they’re Catholic now? They love the pope! So does that make them Catholic? Of course not.

    On the other hand, I know many Catholics who don’t like Pope Francis at all, namely because of the things he’s done. So they protest his actions, and the direction of his papacy, but they simultaneously adhere to all Catholic teaching and vigorously defend it, including Catholic teaching on the authority and primacy of the Pope. So does that make them Protestant now? They believe and practice everything Catholic, but they don’t like this particular pope. Does that make them Protestant? Of course not.

    Being Protestant means rejecting Catholic teaching. Whether you like the Pope or not has nothing to do with it. Historically speaking, some popes were scoundrels, and some were criminals. At least one was a known heretic. I’m sure many Catholics during their day didn’t particularly like them. Does that mean they ceased to be Catholic? I hope not. Being Catholic isn’t dependent upon whether or not you like a particular pope, or agree with the way he’s doing things. Being Catholic means adhering to Catholic teaching, and practicing Catholic religion, and not protesting Catholic doctrine.

    I know many Catholics who are faithful and active Catholics. I know many Catholics who are lapsed Catholics, but they’re still Catholic. A lapsed Catholic is a Catholic who no longer practices the faith, but still believes it to be true. His lapsed status can be because of sin, depression, anger, fear, or any number of things. But he’s still a Catholic. A Catholic doesn’t become a Protestant until he starts “protesting” Catholic teaching. I know a few of those too. Some of them can’t admit they’re Protestants yet. They like to call themselves “Catholic,” but they protest just about everything the Catholic Church teaches. These people are in denial. These are closet Protestants camping out in Catholic parishes. They deny Church teaching on abortion, contraception, homosexuality, same-sex “marriage,” women’s ordination and some of them even deny Church teaching on the Eucharist! There’s your closet Protestants, Your Eminence, not Catholics who just have a little beef with Pope Francis on this issue or that.

    The whole thing has been rather serendipitous to me. On the one hand, I had a conversation with a Protestant over her connection to the Catholic Church through baptism. Then on the other hand, I read about a cardinal who calls Catholics “Protestants” because they don’t like this pope. What a world! Yet one good came out. It broke through my writer’s block and gave me something to blog about this week. I hope it helps you in some way.

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    6 COMMENTS
    GenesisBlueprint
    GenesisBlueprint
    7h ago
    This is so well explained. Thank you for the clarity and confirmation of a feeling I’ve been having ever since I started reading Catholic history and the church fathers. I am a Seventh-Day-Adventist’s. I was born into it and if you know anything about SDA, then you will know they are probably the worst anti-Catholic Protestant denomination. The Adventist prophet, Ellen G White, wrote an entire series specifically against the Catholic Church. So it’s a struggle for me, yet I’ve always had this “feeling” that the Catholic stuff I’m reading is actually true. I just could never put my finger on why that feeling keeps coming up.
    Then you write this and bam! It all makes sense because I’ve had a Catholic baptism and believe in the trinity.

    Reply1Like
    Shane Schaetzel
    Shane Schaetzel
    GenesisBlueprint
    7h ago
    Correct. Through this baptism in the Trinity you’ve already been initiated into the Catholic Church. You just find yourself in the awkward position of being moored to the dock with a 30-foot rope. Nevertheless, you are connected to the dock. My advice is to grab the rope (your Trinitarian baptism), pull the boat into the dock. Get out and walk around a bit. See what it’s like. If you don’t like it, you can always get back in the boat and think about it some more. God bless. 😊

    Reply1Like
    GenesisBlueprint
    GenesisBlueprint
    Shane Schaetzel
    7h ago
    Any advice on how to go about studying the formation of the belief in the trinity? Do I just keep reading through the church fathers? Would be amazing to have some cemented, foundational knowledge that the Catholic Church developed that and not the Protestants.

    ReplyLike
    Shane Schaetzel
    Shane Schaetzel
    GenesisBlueprint
    6h ago
    There are plenty of references to the Trinity in the writings of the Church Fathers, but where you see the doctrine crystallize is during the Council of Nicea (AD 325). Read about that.

    Also, the writings and Creed of St. Athanasius, who effectively opposed the Arians (ancient precursor to Jehovah’s Witneses), and formulated the canon of our New Testament, are very helpful. He was a Catholic Bishop. The synods of Rome, Hippo and Carthage (late 4th century) used St. Athanasius’ canon to give us the New Testament we all use today.

    Protestants are late comers. They wouldn’t enter the conversation until over a thousand years later.

    ReplyLike
    sallyball8323
    sallyball8323
    GenesisBlueprint
    6h ago
    Thanks for this article. The boat analogy is helpful. I am a Catholic convert too. 🤗

    Reply1Like
    samo lucija
    samo lucija
    just now
    Your comment is awaiting moderation.

    yours arguments are similar to BREXIT you dont have to like the POPE but in all 3 faiths must choose GOD WILL before yours owm . GOD BLESS !AMEN ” Jesus leaves His image on the “veil” of the soul. In other words, while contemplating the Face of Jesus in an image, in the Word of God in the Scriptures, in a person made in the image and likeness of God, or above all, in the Eucharist, the soul places itself in the Presence of God. When we are turned completely toward the Face of God, through a daily face-to-face encounter in prayer–by the power of the Holy Spirit–God gradually transforms the soul into the “True Image” of His Son, Jesus Christ. As Pope St. John Paul II says, our hearts must become an “effigy of truth,” a “true icon.” Then our name too will be born from what we gaze upon. It will be “Veronica.”

    – ČETVRTAK
    03. NKG – Svagdan

    SLUŽBA ČITANJA

    POZIVNIK

    R. Otvori, Gospodine, usne moje.
    O. I usta će moja navješćivati hvalu tvoju.

    PSALAM 95 (94). Poziv na Božju hvalu
    Bodrite jedni druge dan za danom dok još odjekuje ono ‘danas’ (Heb 3, 13).
    (Umjesto Ps 95 (94) može se uzeti i Psalam 100 (99) ili Psalam 67 (66) ili Psalam 24 (23))

    Antifona
    Dođite, poklonimo se Gospodinu,
    jer on je Bog naš.

    Dođite, kličimo Gospodinu, *
    uzvikujmo Hridi, Spasitelju svome!
    Pred lice mu stupimo s hvalama, *
    kličimo mu u pjesmama!(Ant.).

    Jer Gospodin je Bog velik, *
    Kralj velik nad svim bogovima.
    U njegovoj su ruci zemaljske dubine, *
    njegovi su vrhunci planina.
    Njegovo je more, on ga je stvorio, *
    i kopno koje načiniše ruke njegove:(Ant.).

    Dođite, prignimo koljena i padnimo nice, *
    poklonimo se Gospodinu koji nas stvori!
    Jer on je Bog naš, *
    a mi narod paše njegove, ovce što on ih čuva.(Ant.).

    O da danas glas mu poslušate: †
    »Ne budite srca tvrda kao u Meribi, *
    kao u dan Mase u pustinji
    gdje me iskušavahu očevi vaši, *
    iskušavahu, premda vidješe djela moja.(Ant.).

    Četrdeset mi ljeta dodijavao naraštaj onaj, †
    pa rekoh: Narod su nestalna srca, *
    i ne proniču moje putove.
    Tako se zakleh u svom gnjevu: *
    Nikad neće ući u moj počinak!«(Ant.).

    Slava Ocu i Sinu *
    i Duhu Svetomu.
    Kako bijaše na početku, †
    tako i sada i vazda *
    i u vijeke vjekova. Amen.(Ant.).

    HIMAN

    (ako se slavi noću ili rano ujutro)

    U noći tone zemlja sva
    I bezbroj šara njezinih,
    Mi tebe slaveć molimo,
    O strogi Suče srdaca.

    Odnesi breme krivnje s nas,
    Operi ljage duševne,
    Daj milost, Kriste, puku svom
    Da tebe više ne vrijeđa.

    Gle trom je duh nam opaki,
    Al grešna savjest grize ga,
    Pa tmini on se otimlje
    I traži tebe, Spasa svog.

    Iz naših grudi, Isuse,
    Ti pomrčinu otjeraj
    I u svom svjetlu blaženom
    Veselje sveto nama daj!

    Nek bude, Kriste, Kralju blag,
    Sa Ocem tebi slava sva
    Ko Tješitelju Presvetom
    I sad i u sve vjekove! Amen.

    Ili po danu:

    Glas molben svojih vjernika
    Ti, Kriste, počuj, molimo:
    Da zloća svijeta prijevarnog
    Ne zamrači nam vjere sjaj.

    Od misli zlih i opakih,
    Od zavisti nas očuvaj,
    Da ne vraćamo zlime zlo,
    Već dobrim zlo da svladamo.

    Daleko od nas svako zlo,
    Oholost, srdžba, prijevara,
    Daleko od nas pohlepa,
    Taj korijen hudi zlima svim.

    Nek iskrena dobrotvornost
    U miru čuva saveze,
    Nek vjernost bude zaštitom
    Nepovrijeđenih vezova.

    O Kriste, Kralju, slava ti
    I s tobom Ocu vječnomu
    Sa Braniteljem preblagim
    U vjekove vjekovječne. Amen.

    1^ Antifona
    Pogledaj, Gospodine,
    i vidi sramotu našu.

    PSALAM 89 (88), 39-46 (IV) Žalopojka nad razorenjem kuće Davidove
    I podiže nam snagu spasenja u domu Davida (Lk 1, 69)

    A sada ti ga odbi i odbaci, *
    silno se razgnjevi na pomazanika svoga.
    Prezre Savez sa slugom svojim, *
    i krunu njegovu do zemlje ponizi.
    Razvali sve zidine njegove, *
    njegove utvrde u ruševine baci.
    Pljačkaju ga svi što naiđu, *
    na ruglo je susjedima svojim.

    Podiže desnicu dušmana njegovih *
    i obradova protivnike njegove.
    Otupi oštricu mača njegova, *
    u boju mu ne pomože.
    Njegovu sjaju kraj učini, *
    njegovo prijestolje na zemlju obori.
    Skratio si dane mladosti njegove, *
    sramotom ga pokrio.

    Slava Ocu i Sinu *
    i Duhu Svetomu.
    Kako bijaše na početku, †
    tako i sada i vazda *
    i u vijeke vjekova. Amen.

    1^ Antifona
    Pogledaj, Gospodine,
    i vidi sramotu našu.

    2^ Antifona
    Ja sam Izdanak i potomak Davidov,
    sjajna zvijezda Danica.

    PSALAM 89 (88), 47-53 (V) Žalopojka nad razorenjem kuće Davidove
    I podiže nam snagu spasenja u domu Davida (Lk 1, 69)

    Ta dokle ćeš, Gospodine? †
    Zar ćeš se uvijek skrivati? *
    Hoće li gnjev tvoj k`o oganj gorjeti?
    Sjeti se kako je kratak život moj, *
    kako si ljude prolazne stvorio!
    Tko živ smrti vidjeti neće? *
    Tko će od ruke Podzemlja dušu sačuvati?

    Gdje li je, Gospodine, tvoja dobrota iskonska *
    kojom se Davidu zakle na vjernost svoju?
    Sjeti se, Gospodine, sramote slugu svojih: *
    u srcu ga nosim od naroda mnogih:
    ruže dušmani tvoji, Gospodine, *
    ruže korake pomazanika tvoga.
    Blagoslovljen Gospodin dovijeka! *
    Tako neka bude. Amen!

    Slava Ocu i Sinu *
    i Duhu Svetomu.
    Kako bijaše na početku, †
    tako i sada i vazda *
    i u vijeke vjekova. Amen.

    2^ Antifona
    Ja sam Izdanak i potomak Davidov,
    sjajna zvijezda Danica.

    3^ Antifona
    Godine naše prolaze poput trave:
    od vijeka, Bože, ti jesi.

    PSALAM 90 (89). Neka slava Gospodnja bude nad nama
    Jedan je dan u Gospodina kao tisuću godina, a tisuću godina kao jedan dan (2 Pt 3,8)

    Gospodine, ti nam bijaše okrilje *
    od koljena do koljena.
    Prije nego se rodiše bregovi, †
    prije nego postade kopno i krug zemaljski, *
    od vijeka do vijeka, Bože, ti jesi!

    Smrtnike u prah vraćaš *
    i veliš: “Vratite se, sinovi ljudski!”
    Jer je tisuću godina u očima tvojim †
    k`o jučerašnji dan koji je minuo *
    i kao straža noćna.

    Razgoniš ih kao jutarnji san, *
    kao trava su što se zeleni:
    jutrom cvate i sva se zeleni, *
    a uvečer − već se suši i vene.

    Zaista, izjeda nas tvoja srdžba *
    i zbunjuje ljutina tvoja.
    Naše si grijehe stavio pred svoje oči, *
    naše potajne grijehe na svjetlost lica svojega.

    Jer svi naši dani prođoše u gnjevu tvojemu, *
    kao uzdah dovršismo godine svoje.
    Zbroj naše dobi sedamdeset je godina, *
    ako smo snažni, i osamdeset;
    a većina od njih muka je i ništavost: *
    jer prolaze brzo i mi letimo odavle.
    Tko će mjeriti žestinu gnjeva tvojega, *
    tko proniknuti srdžbu tvoju?

    Nauči nas dane naše brojiti, *
    da steknemo mudro srce.
    Vrati se k nama, Gospodine! Ta dokle ćeš? *
    Milostiv budi slugama svojim!
    Jutrom nas nasiti smilovanjem svojim, *
    da kličemo i da se veselimo u sve dane!
    Obraduj nas za dane kad si nas šibao, *
    za ljeta kad smo stradali!
    Neka se na slugama tvojim pokaže djelo tvoje *
    i tvoja slava na djeci njihovoj!
    Dobrota Gospodina, Boga našega, *
    neka bude nad nama!
    Daj da nam uspije djelo naših ruku, *
    djelo ruku naših nek uspije.

    Slava Ocu i Sinu *
    i Duhu Svetomu.
    Kako bijaše na početku, †
    tako i sada i vazda *
    i u vijeke vjekova. Amen.

    3^ Antifona
    Godine naše prolaze poput trave:
    od vijeka, Bože, ti jesi.

    R. Gospodine, u tebi je izvor životni.
    O. Tvojom svjetlošću mi ćemo svjetlost vidjeti.

    PRVO ČITANJE:
    Iz Knjige Ponovljenog zakona 30, 1-20

    Obećanje oproštenja nakon izgnanstva

    Kad te sve ove riječi, blagoslov i prokletstvo što ih danas preda te stavih, snađu i ti ih uzmeš k srcu među svim narodima među koje te Gospodin, Bog tvoj, bude protjerao i obratiš se k Gospodinu, Bogu svome, i poslušaš – i ti i tvoji sinovi – glas njegov iz svega srca svoga i iz sve duše svoje u svemu što sam ti danas naredio, tada će Gospodin, Bog tvoj, vratiti tvoje izgnanike; smilovat će se tebi i opet ćete sabrati između svih naroda među koje te bude rastjerao Gospodin, Bog tvoj. Ako bi se koji izgnanik tvoj nalazio i na kraju svijeta, i odande će te sabrati Gospodin, Bog tvoj – odande će te uzeti. Gospodin, Bog tvoj, dovest će te u zemlju koju su posjedovali oci tvoji da je ti zaposjedneš; učinit će te sretnijim i brojnijim od očeva tvojih.
    Gospodin, Bog tvoj, obrezat će tvoje srce, srce tvoga potomstva, tako da ljubiš Gospodina, Boga svoga, iz svega srca svoga i iz sve duše svoje i da živiš. J Gospodin, Bog tvoj, svalit će sva ova prokletstva na neprijatelje tvoje, na mrzitelje tvoje koji su te progonili. A ti ćeš ponovo slušati glas Gospodnji i vršiti sve njegove zapovijedi koje ti danas dajem. Gospodin, Bog tvoj, obilno će te nagrađivati u svakom pothvatu ruku tvojih, u plodu utrobe tvoje, u plodu stoke tvoje i u urodu tvoga plodnog tla; jer Gospodin će se opet radovati nad tvojim dobrom, kao što se radovao nad dobrom otaca tvojih, kad poslušaš glas Gospodina, Boga svoga, držeći njegove zapovijedi i njegove naredbe zapisane u knjizi ovoga Zakona, to jest kada se obratiš Gospodinu, Bogu svome, svim srcem svojim i svom dušom svojom.
    Ova zapovijed što ti je danas dajem nije za te preteška niti je od tebe predaleko. Nije na nebesima da bi rekao: Tko će se za nas popeti na nebesa, skinuti nam je te nam je objaviti da je vršimo? Nije ni preko mora da bi mogao reći: Tko će preko mora za nas poći, donijeti nam je te nam je objaviti da je vršimo? Jer, Riječ je posve blizu tebe, u tvojim ustima i u tvome srcu da je vršiš.
    Gledaj! Danas preda te stavljam: život i sreću, smrt i nesreću. Ako poslušaš zapovijedi Gospodina, Boga svoga, koje ti danas dajem – ako ih poslušaš ljubeći Gospodina, Boga svoga, hodeći njegovim putovima, vršeći njegove zapovijedi, njegove zakone i njegove uredbe, živjet ćeš i razmnožiti će te Gospodin, Bog tvoj, i blagoslovit će te u zemlji u koju ulaziš da je zaposjedneš. Ali ako se srce tvoje odvrati i ne poslušaš, nego zastraniš i budeš se klanjao drugim bogovima i njima iskazivao štovanje, ja vam danas izjavljujem da ćete zaista propasti; nećete dugo živjeti na zemlji u koju ćete, prešavši Jordan, ući da je zaposjednete. Uzimam danas za svjedoke protiv vas nebo i zemlju da pred vas stavljam: život i smrt, blagoslov i prokletstvo. Život, dakle, biraj, ljubeći Gospodina, Boga svoga, slušajući njegov glas, prianjajući uz njega, da živiš ti i tvoje potomstvo. Ta on je život tvoj, tvoj dugi vijek, da bi mirno mogao boraviti na zemlji za koju se Gospodin zakle ocima tvojim Abrahamu, Izaku i Jakovu da će im je dati.”

    Otpjev Jr 29, 13-14; Mt 7, 7
    R. Tražit ćete me i naći jer ćete me tražiti svim srcem svojim. * I pustit ću da me nađete, govori Gospodin. I vratit ću vas na mjesto odakle vas u izgnanstvo odvedoh.
    O. Tražite i naći ćete, kucajte i otvorit će vam se. * I pustit.

    DRUGO ČITANJE:
    Iz Propovijedi svetoga Ivana Maloga, napuljskog biskupa (Prop. 7: PLS 4, 785-787)

    Ljubi Gospodina i hodi putovima njegovim

    Gospodin je svjetlo moje i spasenje moje. Koga da se bojim? Velik je to čovjek koji zna kako se rasvjetljuje,odakle se rasvjetljuje i kakav je onaj koji se rasvjetljuje. On je gledao svjetlost, ali ne ovu koja ide prema sutonu, nego onu svjetlost koju oko ne može vidjeti. Duše rasvijetljene tom svjetlošću ne srću u grijeh, ne zapliću se u mane.
    Govorio je Gospodin: Hodajte dok je svjetlost među vama. Nije to govorio o kojoj drugoj svjetlosti, nego o samom sebi, jer je kazao: ja sam svjetlost što dolazi na svijet, da ne vide oni koji vide i slijepi da ugledaju svjetlost. On je, dakle, svjetlost naša, Sunce pravde, koje obasjava svoju Katoličku crkvu rasprostranjenu po cijelom svijetu. Na njega se odnosi radosni poklik Prorokov: Gospodin je svjetlost moja i spasenje moje.
    Koga da se bojim?
    Nutarnji čovjek koga on prosvjetljuje ne posrće, ne zastranjuje, sve podnosi. Tko izdaleka ugleda svoj zavičaj, lako podnosi nezgode, ne žaloste ga vremenite nesreće,
    jer ga Bog učvršćuje. Skrušuje svoje srce i podnosi, ponizan je i strpljiv. Pravo svjetlo, koje rasvjetljuje svakog čovjeka što dolazi na ovaj svijet, predaje se bogobojaznima, ulijeva se kome hoće, gdje hoće. Sin se objavljuje kome hoće.
    Tko je živio u tami i sjeni smrti, u tami zla i u sjeni grijeha, kad grane svjetlost, zgraža se sam na sebe, osuđuje sam sebe, kaje se, stidi se i govori: Gospodin je svjetlost moja i spasenje moje: koga da se bojim ? Braćo moja, velika je stvar spasenje. To se spasenje ne boji slabosti, ne straši se umora, ne vidi bolest. Moramo stoga potpuno i savršeno govoriti i vršiti ne samo jezikom nego i srcem: Gospodin je svjetlost moja i spasenje
    moje: koga da se bojim ? Ako me on rasvjetljuje, ako me on spašava, koga da se bojim? Sve da dođe tmina napasti, Gospodin je svjetlost moja. Mogu doći, ali ne mogu napredovati, mogu i navaliti na naše srce, ali ne mogu pobijediti. Sve da dođe i sljepilo požuda, Gospodin je svjetlost moja. Snaga je naša onaj koji se nama predaje i kome se mi predajemo. Trčite k liječniku dok možete, da se ne dogodi da ga ne nađete kad
    budete željeli.

    Otpjev Mudr 9,10 .4
    R. Gospodine, pošalji mudrost od svoga slavnog prijestolja, da uza me bude i potrudi se sa mnom, * i da spoznam što je tebi vazda milo.
    O. Daj mi, Gospodine, mudrost, prisjednicu svoga prijestolja. * i da spoznam što je tebi vazda milo.

    Molitva
    Svemogući vječni Bože, ravnaj našim životom da vršimo tvoju volju: da u ime tvoga ljubljenog Sina obilujemo dobrim djelima. Po Gospodinu.

    O. Amen.
    Blagoslivljajmo Gospodina.
    O. Bogu hvala

    Reply
  3. AMERICA IS FULL OF SECTS CHINES STOP ALL FAITH UNLESS YOU BUDISSTS AND HINDUISTS RUSSIA ALSO NONFREE FAITH ONLY ON PAPER LIKE SOME COUPLES marriages
    This morning I read an article (see here) that made me laugh, because it relayed a story about a cardinal in the Catholic Church who doesn’t seem to understand some very basic terms. He suggested that Catholics who protest some actions of the pope ought to become Protestants, because that’s what they essentially are. I couldn’t contain myself. I laughed so hard I nearly spilled my coffee. What made this story particularly funny to me was that just yesterday I had an email exchange with a Protestant about this very same topic. Our exchange was cordial and intelligent, unlike the rhetoric I see coming from liberal clergy in the Catholic Church these days. Without getting into the details of the exchange itself, or delving too deeply into the problems with the cardinal’s assertion, I think it’s time to go through some basic terminology.

    Terms are important because they mean something, and if we use the wrong terms, we tend to create more problems than we solve. I point the finger at myself on this one. I’m guilty of it too, from time to time, especially when I get a little hot-headed. So let’s go into the terms that need to be reviewed and clarified…

    CHRISTIAN: A Christian is any person who has received a Trinitarian baptism. Trinitarian baptisms, done in the “Name of the Father, Son and Holy Spirit” are essentially Catholic baptisms, and are fully recognized by the Catholic Church as 100% valid. A Trinitarian baptism performed in a Baptist Church (for example) is just as “Catholic” as one performed in the Catholic Church. This is why candidates from Protestantism are not “re-baptized” upon entering the Catholic Church. Their baptisms in their Protestant churches are considered fully valid and Catholic. What Protestants usually lack are the sacraments of Reconciliation, Confirmation and Holy Eucharist, as well as a Catholic profession of faith. However, their baptisms are fully Catholic. So, in review, a Trinitarian baptism is a Catholic baptism, and that’s what makes you a Christian. It all starts there. Essentially, a Christian is a baptized Catholic, but that doesn’t mean a Christian will remain Catholic.
    CATHOLIC: A Catholic is any person who has received a Trinitarian baptism, as well as the sacraments of Confirmation and Eucharist in the Catholic Church, and is in communion with the Bishop of Rome (Pope), as evidenced by accepting all the teachings of the Catholic Church (a profession of faith). This is important. What makes you a Catholic is not just the sacraments or saying you’re in communion with the Pope. These things are part of it, but the real key is accepting all the teachings of the Catholic Church. One can be an active Catholic, or a lapsed Catholic, but so long as one still accepts the teachings of the Catholic Church, one is still Catholic.
    PROTESTANT: A Protestant is any person who has received Trinitarian baptism and still believes in the Trinity (making him/her technically a “baptized Catholic” or “Christian”), but who simultaneously rejects some or most of the teachings of the Catholic Church. This is the very definition of the word “Protestant” which means “one who protests.” The word “protest” is written right into the word “PROTESTant.” This is important, because a Protestant is always a “baptized Catholic” or “Christian,” meaning one who received a Trinitarian baptism and still believes in the Trinity, but rejects other Catholic teachings. It doesn’t really matter what these teachings are. It could be teachings about the Pope, Eucharist, Saints, Purgatory, or such things as artificial contraception, abortion, homosexuality, same-sex “marriage,” and female ordination. If one “protests” Catholic teaching on these things, one ceases to be Catholic and becomes PROTESTant.
    Understanding these terms is important. This is why Mormons and Jehovah’s Witnesses are not Protestants. They’re not Protestants because they don’t have Trinitarian (Catholic) baptism. They reject the teaching of the Trinity, and they don’t baptize in the Name of the Trinity. Therefore, they lack a proper Catholic baptism. This means they’re not technically Christians either, in a doctrinal sense, because as the definition of the word “Christian” above states: “A Christian is any person who has received a Trinitarian (Catholic) baptism” and professes faith in the Trinitarian God. There are basically only three types of Christians in the world…

    CATHOLIC — A validly baptized person who accepts the teachings of the Catholic Church and submits to the authority of the Pope.
    ORTHODOX — A validly baptized person who accepts the teachings of the Catholic Church but does not submit to the authority of the Pope. This is known as schism.
    PROTESTANT — A validly baptized person who does not accept the teachings of the Catholic Church. This is known as heresy. And does not submit to the authority of the Pope. This is known as schism.
    So Orthodox Christians are basically Catholics who are in schism with the pope. While Protestant Christians are basically Catholics who “protest” Catholic teaching (heresy) and are also in schism with the pope.

    Understanding this is important when dealing with Orthodox and Protestant Christians. While Orthodox Christians usually know the Catholic Church accepts their Trinitarian baptisms as fully valid and “Catholic,” most Protestants are completely unaware of this. Pointing it out to them can be an ice-breaker. For example; when a Protestant says “I’ll never be Catholic,” a good comeback can be: “Technically you already are at some level. You’ve received a Catholic baptism, and the Catholic Church recognizes that. So it’s like you’ve already got your foot in the door. That Trinitarian baptism ties you to the Catholic Church like a boat moored to a dock. You can’t leave the Catholic Church entirely unless you cut the mooring of your Trinitarian baptism, but if you do that you’ll cease to be Christian as well.”

    As you can imagine, a comeback like that throws them on their heels. The concept of being connected, or tied, to the Catholic Church probably never occurred to them before. Now depending on how anti-Catholic they are, they may or may not accept this. But it doesn’t matter. The seed has been planted, and if it doesn’t sprout in their minds, it might sprout in others who overheard it.

    This is an important clarification that came out of the Second Vatican Council, but Vatican II did not invent it. It was taught prior to the council, by popes and bishops, and even in some catechisms. But it wasn’t clearly defined until the Second Vatican Council. I know some Catholics have a problem with Vatican II, and truth be told, I have some minor problems with it too. But I’m not in the habit of throwing the baby out with the bathwater. I interpret Vatican II within the Hermeneutic of Continuity, as Pope Paul VI and Pope Benedict XVI taught us. There is no other valid interpretation of Vatican II. It must be in continuity with the historical Church, and this teaching about Protestants and baptism is.

    docked
    Docked and Berthed Boats

    If we think of the Catholic Church like a dock, then Catholics are those people freely walking up and down the dock on to shore. Orthodox Christians are like boats fully docked to the dock, like being berthed in a boat slip, tied on all corners and secured. While Protestant Christians are moored to the dock, tied on one end (usually by the bow of the boat), to a post on the dock. The stern of the boat may move about, and be unsecured, but the boat is still tied (moored), at least on one end, to something on the dock, or something connected to the dock. The connection is real and it is secure. The boat may move about much more than one that is fully docked or berthed, but it’s still attached to the dock.

    OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
    A Moored Boat: One Rope Attached to Dock

    This is the situation Protestants find themselves in. The Catholic Church is like a dock. Protestants are attached to the Catholic Church by the Sacrament of Trinitarian Baptism, like a rope, which is what the Catholic Church herself recognizes as initiation into the Catholic Church. But at the same time, these Protestants refuse to be connected to the Catholic Church in any other way. The only way they can be truly independent and free of Rome is to cut the “rope” of Trinitarian baptism that ties them to the “dock” of the Catholic Church. But if they do that, they cease to be Christian entirely, and are no different than Mormons or Jehovah’s Witnesses. It’s quite a pickle, actually, especially for those Protestants who happen to be very anti-Catholic. They hate the dock. They curse the dock. They may even spit on the dock. Yet they are tied to the dock whether they like it or not, and they cannot leave unless they give up their faith in the Trinity.

    Giving this illustration to Protestants helps them better understand their relationship to the Catholic Church, as well as their dependence upon it. This is how we can better understand the Catholic teaching of extra Ecclesiam nulla salus or “outside the Church there is no salvation.” Protestants are indeed connected to the Catholic Church, even if it’s just by one “rope” so to speak, which is Trinitarian baptism, but their loose affiliation puts them in a very precarious and vulnerable position, subject to the waves and storms of life. They would be better off fully docked or berthed like the Orthodox, or better yet, walking freely on the dock itself as a Catholic. As the Universal Catechism of St. John Paul II teaches…

    “Outside the Church there is no salvation”

    846 How are we to understand this affirmation, often repeated by the Church Fathers? Re-formulated positively, it means that all salvation comes from Christ the Head through the Church which is his Body:

    Basing itself on Scripture and Tradition, the Council teaches that the Church, a pilgrim now on earth, is necessary for salvation: the one Christ is the mediator and the way of salvation; he is present to us in his body which is the Church. He himself explicitly asserted the necessity of faith and Baptism, and thereby affirmed at the same time the necessity of the Church which men enter through Baptism as through a door. Hence they could not be saved who, knowing that the Catholic Church was founded as necessary by God through Christ, would refuse either to enter it or to remain in it.

    838 “The Church knows that she is joined in many ways to the baptized who are honored by the name of Christian, but do not profess the Catholic faith in its entirety or have not preserved unity or communion under the successor of Peter.” Those “who believe in Christ and have been properly baptized are put in a certain, although imperfect, communion with the Catholic Church.” With the Orthodox Churches, this communion is so profound “that it lacks little to attain the fullness that would permit a common celebration of the Lord’s Eucharist.”

    These highlighted statements in Catechism 846 & 838 is a direct reference to Protestants who have received Trinitarian baptism. Their baptism is essentially “Catholic” in every sense, and they have therefore been initiated into the Catholic Church, but their initiation is incomplete because they “protest” Catholic teaching. Thus, a Protestant is a baptized Catholic who protests Catholic teaching.

    What made me laugh about the cardinal’s statement in the referenced article above was that he equated Protestantism with protest of a man or his actions, rather than protesting doctrine. It causes me to question if the cardinal understands what the word “Protestant” actually means.

    I spent the first 30 years of my life in Protestantism. I think I know a thing or two about it. My Protestantism was based on doctrine, always on doctrine, and never on people. I never had a problem with the person of Pope St. John Paul II. I always thought he was a pretty cool guy. When he kissed the Koran that one time, I thought “well, that’s weird” and he really shouldn’t have done it, but I basically ignored it. My separation from Rome was never contingent on what any pope did or didn’t do. Frankly, I didn’t care. My schism with Rome was based on things like Purgatory, Prayer to Saints, Mary, the Eucharist, and Faith vs. Works. I really didn’t give a hoot about the Pope and what he did or didn’t do.

    I know many Protestants who absolutely LOVE Pope Francis, and think he’s the greatest thing since the invention of the printing press, but they still protest Catholic doctrine on the Saints, Purgatory, Eucharist, etc. Does that mean they’re Catholic now? They love the pope! So does that make them Catholic? Of course not.

    On the other hand, I know many Catholics who don’t like Pope Francis at all, namely because of the things he’s done. So they protest his actions, and the direction of his papacy, but they simultaneously adhere to all Catholic teaching and vigorously defend it, including Catholic teaching on the authority and primacy of the Pope. So does that make them Protestant now? They believe and practice everything Catholic, but they don’t like this particular pope. Does that make them Protestant? Of course not.

    Being Protestant means rejecting Catholic teaching. Whether you like the Pope or not has nothing to do with it. Historically speaking, some popes were scoundrels, and some were criminals. At least one was a known heretic. I’m sure many Catholics during their day didn’t particularly like them. Does that mean they ceased to be Catholic? I hope not. Being Catholic isn’t dependent upon whether or not you like a particular pope, or agree with the way he’s doing things. Being Catholic means adhering to Catholic teaching, and practicing Catholic religion, and not protesting Catholic doctrine.

    I know many Catholics who are faithful and active Catholics. I know many Catholics who are lapsed Catholics, but they’re still Catholic. A lapsed Catholic is a Catholic who no longer practices the faith, but still believes it to be true. His lapsed status can be because of sin, depression, anger, fear, or any number of things. But he’s still a Catholic. A Catholic doesn’t become a Protestant until he starts “protesting” Catholic teaching. I know a few of those too. Some of them can’t admit they’re Protestants yet. They like to call themselves “Catholic,” but they protest just about everything the Catholic Church teaches. These people are in denial. These are closet Protestants camping out in Catholic parishes. They deny Church teaching on abortion, contraception, homosexuality, same-sex “marriage,” women’s ordination and some of them even deny Church teaching on the Eucharist! There’s your closet Protestants, Your Eminence, not Catholics who just have a little beef with Pope Francis on this issue or that.

    The whole thing has been rather serendipitous to me. On the one hand, I had a conversation with a Protestant over her connection to the Catholic Church through baptism. Then on the other hand, I read about a cardinal who calls Catholics “Protestants” because they don’t like this pope. What a world! Yet one good came out. It broke through my writer’s block and gave me something to blog about this week. I hope it helps you in some way.

    Share
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    6 COMMENTS
    GenesisBlueprint
    GenesisBlueprint
    7h ago
    This is so well explained. Thank you for the clarity and confirmation of a feeling I’ve been having ever since I started reading Catholic history and the church fathers. I am a Seventh-Day-Adventist’s. I was born into it and if you know anything about SDA, then you will know they are probably the worst anti-Catholic Protestant denomination. The Adventist prophet, Ellen G White, wrote an entire series specifically against the Catholic Church. So it’s a struggle for me, yet I’ve always had this “feeling” that the Catholic stuff I’m reading is actually true. I just could never put my finger on why that feeling keeps coming up.
    Then you write this and bam! It all makes sense because I’ve had a Catholic baptism and believe in the trinity.

    Reply1Like
    Shane Schaetzel
    Shane Schaetzel
    GenesisBlueprint
    7h ago
    Correct. Through this baptism in the Trinity you’ve already been initiated into the Catholic Church. You just find yourself in the awkward position of being moored to the dock with a 30-foot rope. Nevertheless, you are connected to the dock. My advice is to grab the rope (your Trinitarian baptism), pull the boat into the dock. Get out and walk around a bit. See what it’s like. If you don’t like it, you can always get back in the boat and think about it some more. God bless. 😊

    Reply1Like
    GenesisBlueprint
    GenesisBlueprint
    Shane Schaetzel
    7h ago
    Any advice on how to go about studying the formation of the belief in the trinity? Do I just keep reading through the church fathers? Would be amazing to have some cemented, foundational knowledge that the Catholic Church developed that and not the Protestants.

    ReplyLike
    Shane Schaetzel
    Shane Schaetzel
    GenesisBlueprint
    6h ago
    There are plenty of references to the Trinity in the writings of the Church Fathers, but where you see the doctrine crystallize is during the Council of Nicea (AD 325). Read about that.

    Also, the writings and Creed of St. Athanasius, who effectively opposed the Arians (ancient precursor to Jehovah’s Witneses), and formulated the canon of our New Testament, are very helpful. He was a Catholic Bishop. The synods of Rome, Hippo and Carthage (late 4th century) used St. Athanasius’ canon to give us the New Testament we all use today.

    Protestants are late comers. They wouldn’t enter the conversation until over a thousand years later.

    ReplyLike
    sallyball8323
    sallyball8323
    GenesisBlueprint
    6h ago
    Thanks for this article. The boat analogy is helpful. I am a Catholic convert too. 🤗

    Reply1Like
    samo lucija
    samo lucija
    just now
    Your comment is awaiting moderation.

    yours arguments are similar to BREXIT you dont have to like the POPE but in all 3 faiths must choose GOD WILL before yours owm . GOD BLESS !AMEN ” Jesus leaves His image on the “veil” of the soul. In other words, while contemplating the Face of Jesus in an image, in the Word of God in the Scriptures, in a person made in the image and likeness of God, or above all, in the Eucharist, the soul places itself in the Presence of God. When we are turned completely toward the Face of God, through a daily face-to-face encounter in prayer–by the power of the Holy Spirit–God gradually transforms the soul into the “True Image” of His Son, Jesus Christ. As Pope St. John Paul II says, our hearts must become an “effigy of truth,” a “true icon.” Then our name too will be born from what we gaze upon. It will be “Veronica.”

    – ČETVRTAK
    03. NKG – Svagdan

    SLUŽBA ČITANJA

    POZIVNIK

    R. Otvori, Gospodine, usne moje.
    O. I usta će moja navješćivati hvalu tvoju.

    PSALAM 95 (94). Poziv na Božju hvalu
    Bodrite jedni druge dan za danom dok još odjekuje ono ‘danas’ (Heb 3, 13).
    (Umjesto Ps 95 (94) može se uzeti i Psalam 100 (99) ili Psalam 67 (66) ili Psalam 24 (23))

    Antifona
    Dođite, poklonimo se Gospodinu,
    jer on je Bog naš.

    Dođite, kličimo Gospodinu, *
    uzvikujmo Hridi, Spasitelju svome!
    Pred lice mu stupimo s hvalama, *
    kličimo mu u pjesmama!(Ant.).

    Jer Gospodin je Bog velik, *
    Kralj velik nad svim bogovima.
    U njegovoj su ruci zemaljske dubine, *
    njegovi su vrhunci planina.
    Njegovo je more, on ga je stvorio, *
    i kopno koje načiniše ruke njegove:(Ant.).

    Dođite, prignimo koljena i padnimo nice, *
    poklonimo se Gospodinu koji nas stvori!
    Jer on je Bog naš, *
    a mi narod paše njegove, ovce što on ih čuva.(Ant.).

    O da danas glas mu poslušate: †
    »Ne budite srca tvrda kao u Meribi, *
    kao u dan Mase u pustinji
    gdje me iskušavahu očevi vaši, *
    iskušavahu, premda vidješe djela moja.(Ant.).

    Četrdeset mi ljeta dodijavao naraštaj onaj, †
    pa rekoh: Narod su nestalna srca, *
    i ne proniču moje putove.
    Tako se zakleh u svom gnjevu: *
    Nikad neće ući u moj počinak!«(Ant.).

    Slava Ocu i Sinu *
    i Duhu Svetomu.
    Kako bijaše na početku, †
    tako i sada i vazda *
    i u vijeke vjekova. Amen.(Ant.).

    HIMAN

    (ako se slavi noću ili rano ujutro)

    U noći tone zemlja sva
    I bezbroj šara njezinih,
    Mi tebe slaveć molimo,
    O strogi Suče srdaca.

    Odnesi breme krivnje s nas,
    Operi ljage duševne,
    Daj milost, Kriste, puku svom
    Da tebe više ne vrijeđa.

    Gle trom je duh nam opaki,
    Al grešna savjest grize ga,
    Pa tmini on se otimlje
    I traži tebe, Spasa svog.

    Iz naših grudi, Isuse,
    Ti pomrčinu otjeraj
    I u svom svjetlu blaženom
    Veselje sveto nama daj!

    Nek bude, Kriste, Kralju blag,
    Sa Ocem tebi slava sva
    Ko Tješitelju Presvetom
    I sad i u sve vjekove! Amen.

    Ili po danu:

    Glas molben svojih vjernika
    Ti, Kriste, počuj, molimo:
    Da zloća svijeta prijevarnog
    Ne zamrači nam vjere sjaj.

    Od misli zlih i opakih,
    Od zavisti nas očuvaj,
    Da ne vraćamo zlime zlo,
    Već dobrim zlo da svladamo.

    Daleko od nas svako zlo,
    Oholost, srdžba, prijevara,
    Daleko od nas pohlepa,
    Taj korijen hudi zlima svim.

    Nek iskrena dobrotvornost
    U miru čuva saveze,
    Nek vjernost bude zaštitom
    Nepovrijeđenih vezova.

    O Kriste, Kralju, slava ti
    I s tobom Ocu vječnomu
    Sa Braniteljem preblagim
    U vjekove vjekovječne. Amen.

    1^ Antifona
    Pogledaj, Gospodine,
    i vidi sramotu našu.

    PSALAM 89 (88), 39-46 (IV) Žalopojka nad razorenjem kuće Davidove
    I podiže nam snagu spasenja u domu Davida (Lk 1, 69)

    A sada ti ga odbi i odbaci, *
    silno se razgnjevi na pomazanika svoga.
    Prezre Savez sa slugom svojim, *
    i krunu njegovu do zemlje ponizi.
    Razvali sve zidine njegove, *
    njegove utvrde u ruševine baci.
    Pljačkaju ga svi što naiđu, *
    na ruglo je susjedima svojim.

    Podiže desnicu dušmana njegovih *
    i obradova protivnike njegove.
    Otupi oštricu mača njegova, *
    u boju mu ne pomože.
    Njegovu sjaju kraj učini, *
    njegovo prijestolje na zemlju obori.
    Skratio si dane mladosti njegove, *
    sramotom ga pokrio.

    Slava Ocu i Sinu *
    i Duhu Svetomu.
    Kako bijaše na početku, †
    tako i sada i vazda *
    i u vijeke vjekova. Amen.

    1^ Antifona
    Pogledaj, Gospodine,
    i vidi sramotu našu.

    2^ Antifona
    Ja sam Izdanak i potomak Davidov,
    sjajna zvijezda Danica.

    PSALAM 89 (88), 47-53 (V) Žalopojka nad razorenjem kuće Davidove
    I podiže nam snagu spasenja u domu Davida (Lk 1, 69)

    Ta dokle ćeš, Gospodine? †
    Zar ćeš se uvijek skrivati? *
    Hoće li gnjev tvoj k`o oganj gorjeti?
    Sjeti se kako je kratak život moj, *
    kako si ljude prolazne stvorio!
    Tko živ smrti vidjeti neće? *
    Tko će od ruke Podzemlja dušu sačuvati?

    Gdje li je, Gospodine, tvoja dobrota iskonska *
    kojom se Davidu zakle na vjernost svoju?
    Sjeti se, Gospodine, sramote slugu svojih: *
    u srcu ga nosim od naroda mnogih:
    ruže dušmani tvoji, Gospodine, *
    ruže korake pomazanika tvoga.
    Blagoslovljen Gospodin dovijeka! *
    Tako neka bude. Amen!

    Slava Ocu i Sinu *
    i Duhu Svetomu.
    Kako bijaše na početku, †
    tako i sada i vazda *
    i u vijeke vjekova. Amen.

    2^ Antifona
    Ja sam Izdanak i potomak Davidov,
    sjajna zvijezda Danica.

    3^ Antifona
    Godine naše prolaze poput trave:
    od vijeka, Bože, ti jesi.

    PSALAM 90 (89). Neka slava Gospodnja bude nad nama
    Jedan je dan u Gospodina kao tisuću godina, a tisuću godina kao jedan dan (2 Pt 3,8)

    Gospodine, ti nam bijaše okrilje *
    od koljena do koljena.
    Prije nego se rodiše bregovi, †
    prije nego postade kopno i krug zemaljski, *
    od vijeka do vijeka, Bože, ti jesi!

    Smrtnike u prah vraćaš *
    i veliš: “Vratite se, sinovi ljudski!”
    Jer je tisuću godina u očima tvojim †
    k`o jučerašnji dan koji je minuo *
    i kao straža noćna.

    Razgoniš ih kao jutarnji san, *
    kao trava su što se zeleni:
    jutrom cvate i sva se zeleni, *
    a uvečer − već se suši i vene.

    Zaista, izjeda nas tvoja srdžba *
    i zbunjuje ljutina tvoja.
    Naše si grijehe stavio pred svoje oči, *
    naše potajne grijehe na svjetlost lica svojega.

    Jer svi naši dani prođoše u gnjevu tvojemu, *
    kao uzdah dovršismo godine svoje.
    Zbroj naše dobi sedamdeset je godina, *
    ako smo snažni, i osamdeset;
    a većina od njih muka je i ništavost: *
    jer prolaze brzo i mi letimo odavle.
    Tko će mjeriti žestinu gnjeva tvojega, *
    tko proniknuti srdžbu tvoju?

    Nauči nas dane naše brojiti, *
    da steknemo mudro srce.
    Vrati se k nama, Gospodine! Ta dokle ćeš? *
    Milostiv budi slugama svojim!
    Jutrom nas nasiti smilovanjem svojim, *
    da kličemo i da se veselimo u sve dane!
    Obraduj nas za dane kad si nas šibao, *
    za ljeta kad smo stradali!
    Neka se na slugama tvojim pokaže djelo tvoje *
    i tvoja slava na djeci njihovoj!
    Dobrota Gospodina, Boga našega, *
    neka bude nad nama!
    Daj da nam uspije djelo naših ruku, *
    djelo ruku naših nek uspije.

    Slava Ocu i Sinu *
    i Duhu Svetomu.
    Kako bijaše na početku, †
    tako i sada i vazda *
    i u vijeke vjekova. Amen.

    3^ Antifona
    Godine naše prolaze poput trave:
    od vijeka, Bože, ti jesi.

    R. Gospodine, u tebi je izvor životni.
    O. Tvojom svjetlošću mi ćemo svjetlost vidjeti.

    PRVO ČITANJE:
    Iz Knjige Ponovljenog zakona 30, 1-20

    Obećanje oproštenja nakon izgnanstva

    Kad te sve ove riječi, blagoslov i prokletstvo što ih danas preda te stavih, snađu i ti ih uzmeš k srcu među svim narodima među koje te Gospodin, Bog tvoj, bude protjerao i obratiš se k Gospodinu, Bogu svome, i poslušaš – i ti i tvoji sinovi – glas njegov iz svega srca svoga i iz sve duše svoje u svemu što sam ti danas naredio, tada će Gospodin, Bog tvoj, vratiti tvoje izgnanike; smilovat će se tebi i opet ćete sabrati između svih naroda među koje te bude rastjerao Gospodin, Bog tvoj. Ako bi se koji izgnanik tvoj nalazio i na kraju svijeta, i odande će te sabrati Gospodin, Bog tvoj – odande će te uzeti. Gospodin, Bog tvoj, dovest će te u zemlju koju su posjedovali oci tvoji da je ti zaposjedneš; učinit će te sretnijim i brojnijim od očeva tvojih.
    Gospodin, Bog tvoj, obrezat će tvoje srce, srce tvoga potomstva, tako da ljubiš Gospodina, Boga svoga, iz svega srca svoga i iz sve duše svoje i da živiš. J Gospodin, Bog tvoj, svalit će sva ova prokletstva na neprijatelje tvoje, na mrzitelje tvoje koji su te progonili. A ti ćeš ponovo slušati glas Gospodnji i vršiti sve njegove zapovijedi koje ti danas dajem. Gospodin, Bog tvoj, obilno će te nagrađivati u svakom pothvatu ruku tvojih, u plodu utrobe tvoje, u plodu stoke tvoje i u urodu tvoga plodnog tla; jer Gospodin će se opet radovati nad tvojim dobrom, kao što se radovao nad dobrom otaca tvojih, kad poslušaš glas Gospodina, Boga svoga, držeći njegove zapovijedi i njegove naredbe zapisane u knjizi ovoga Zakona, to jest kada se obratiš Gospodinu, Bogu svome, svim srcem svojim i svom dušom svojom.
    Ova zapovijed što ti je danas dajem nije za te preteška niti je od tebe predaleko. Nije na nebesima da bi rekao: Tko će se za nas popeti na nebesa, skinuti nam je te nam je objaviti da je vršimo? Nije ni preko mora da bi mogao reći: Tko će preko mora za nas poći, donijeti nam je te nam je objaviti da je vršimo? Jer, Riječ je posve blizu tebe, u tvojim ustima i u tvome srcu da je vršiš.
    Gledaj! Danas preda te stavljam: život i sreću, smrt i nesreću. Ako poslušaš zapovijedi Gospodina, Boga svoga, koje ti danas dajem – ako ih poslušaš ljubeći Gospodina, Boga svoga, hodeći njegovim putovima, vršeći njegove zapovijedi, njegove zakone i njegove uredbe, živjet ćeš i razmnožiti će te Gospodin, Bog tvoj, i blagoslovit će te u zemlji u koju ulaziš da je zaposjedneš. Ali ako se srce tvoje odvrati i ne poslušaš, nego zastraniš i budeš se klanjao drugim bogovima i njima iskazivao štovanje, ja vam danas izjavljujem da ćete zaista propasti; nećete dugo živjeti na zemlji u koju ćete, prešavši Jordan, ući da je zaposjednete. Uzimam danas za svjedoke protiv vas nebo i zemlju da pred vas stavljam: život i smrt, blagoslov i prokletstvo. Život, dakle, biraj, ljubeći Gospodina, Boga svoga, slušajući njegov glas, prianjajući uz njega, da živiš ti i tvoje potomstvo. Ta on je život tvoj, tvoj dugi vijek, da bi mirno mogao boraviti na zemlji za koju se Gospodin zakle ocima tvojim Abrahamu, Izaku i Jakovu da će im je dati.”

    Otpjev Jr 29, 13-14; Mt 7, 7
    R. Tražit ćete me i naći jer ćete me tražiti svim srcem svojim. * I pustit ću da me nađete, govori Gospodin. I vratit ću vas na mjesto odakle vas u izgnanstvo odvedoh.
    O. Tražite i naći ćete, kucajte i otvorit će vam se. * I pustit.

    DRUGO ČITANJE:
    Iz Propovijedi svetoga Ivana Maloga, napuljskog biskupa (Prop. 7: PLS 4, 785-787)

    Ljubi Gospodina i hodi putovima njegovim

    Gospodin je svjetlo moje i spasenje moje. Koga da se bojim? Velik je to čovjek koji zna kako se rasvjetljuje,odakle se rasvjetljuje i kakav je onaj koji se rasvjetljuje. On je gledao svjetlost, ali ne ovu koja ide prema sutonu, nego onu svjetlost koju oko ne može vidjeti. Duše rasvijetljene tom svjetlošću ne srću u grijeh, ne zapliću se u mane.
    Govorio je Gospodin: Hodajte dok je svjetlost među vama. Nije to govorio o kojoj drugoj svjetlosti, nego o samom sebi, jer je kazao: ja sam svjetlost što dolazi na svijet, da ne vide oni koji vide i slijepi da ugledaju svjetlost. On je, dakle, svjetlost naša, Sunce pravde, koje obasjava svoju Katoličku crkvu rasprostranjenu po cijelom svijetu. Na njega se odnosi radosni poklik Prorokov: Gospodin je svjetlost moja i spasenje moje.
    Koga da se bojim?
    Nutarnji čovjek koga on prosvjetljuje ne posrće, ne zastranjuje, sve podnosi. Tko izdaleka ugleda svoj zavičaj, lako podnosi nezgode, ne žaloste ga vremenite nesreće,
    jer ga Bog učvršćuje. Skrušuje svoje srce i podnosi, ponizan je i strpljiv. Pravo svjetlo, koje rasvjetljuje svakog čovjeka što dolazi na ovaj svijet, predaje se bogobojaznima, ulijeva se kome hoće, gdje hoće. Sin se objavljuje kome hoće.
    Tko je živio u tami i sjeni smrti, u tami zla i u sjeni grijeha, kad grane svjetlost, zgraža se sam na sebe, osuđuje sam sebe, kaje se, stidi se i govori: Gospodin je svjetlost moja i spasenje moje: koga da se bojim ? Braćo moja, velika je stvar spasenje. To se spasenje ne boji slabosti, ne straši se umora, ne vidi bolest. Moramo stoga potpuno i savršeno govoriti i vršiti ne samo jezikom nego i srcem: Gospodin je svjetlost moja i spasenje
    moje: koga da se bojim ? Ako me on rasvjetljuje, ako me on spašava, koga da se bojim? Sve da dođe tmina napasti, Gospodin je svjetlost moja. Mogu doći, ali ne mogu napredovati, mogu i navaliti na naše srce, ali ne mogu pobijediti. Sve da dođe i sljepilo požuda, Gospodin je svjetlost moja. Snaga je naša onaj koji se nama predaje i kome se mi predajemo. Trčite k liječniku dok možete, da se ne dogodi da ga ne nađete kad
    budete željeli.

    Otpjev Mudr 9,10 .4
    R. Gospodine, pošalji mudrost od svoga slavnog prijestolja, da uza me bude i potrudi se sa mnom, * i da spoznam što je tebi vazda milo.
    O. Daj mi, Gospodine, mudrost, prisjednicu svoga prijestolja. * i da spoznam što je tebi vazda milo.

    Molitva
    Svemogući vječni Bože, ravnaj našim životom da vršimo tvoju volju: da u ime tvoga ljubljenog Sina obilujemo dobrim djelima. Po Gospodinu.

    O. Amen.
    Blagoslivljajmo Gospodina.
    O. Bogu hvala

    Reply
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