I Love You but You Didn’t Do the Reading

A collection of stories SAGLRROILYBYGTH might have missed this past week from around the interwebs:

From our great neighbor to the north: Alberta’s provincial government stands accused of funneling public money to a school that taught Scientology.  HT: DK

John Fea collected historians’ comments about President Trump’s latest foray into wacky history.

READING goofy washington

Words, words, words…

What’s the real black/white “achievement gap” in public schools? Maybe the problem is that white teachers are not as good as African American ones.

Lots of progressive teachers hate the way the federal government imposed tons of high-stakes standardized tests. Could the Trump administration become their anti-testing friend? California is testing the testing waters.

A new trend? Or a go-nowhere stunt? To alleviate the shortage of STEM teachers, North Carolina’s legislature is mooting a bill to allow college professors to teach in K12 schools without certification or licensure.

Check your calendar: What year is this? A NYC school official is accused of communism, as the New York Times reports.

Senator Mark Green is out. Trump’s creationist pick for Secretary of the Army has withdrawn his nomination, due to criticism over his anti-LGBTQ statements.

Campus protest as a “know-nothing” performance: John McWhorter makes his case at the Daily Beast.

Thanks to all the SAGLRROILYBYGTH who sent in tips and stories.

What Goes On in Medical School?

HT: MM

It’s probably nothing. But the latest in-your-face conservative pick by President Trump adds one more leg to the stool. Is there some reason why so many prominent radical creationists are medical doctors?

mark green

Creating a modern military….

Tennessee Senator Mark Green is only the latest. He is awaiting confirmation hearings to become Secretary of the Army. He’s already taking some heat for his official proclamations about gender and sexuality. In 2015, he delivered a fiery creationist sermon to a Cincinnati church.

For those of us who keep track of such things, Senator Green apparently emphasized two favorite notions of twenty-first century creationists. He insisted that the second law of thermodynamics militated against evolution. Since entropy increases over time, the argument goes, things won’t get more organized over time, but less.

As Green put it,

If you put a lawn mower out in your yard and a hundred years come back, it’s rusted and falling apart. You can’t put parts out there and a hundred years later it’s gonna come back together. That is a violation of a law of thermodynamics. A physical law that exists in the universe.

Green also embraced the “irreducible complexity” argument beloved by today’s intelligent designers. As articulated by biochemist Michael Behe, this argument points to some organic systems such as blood-clotting. If the entire process needs to be in place in order to confer any evolutionary benefit, the argument goes (roughly), then it makes no sense for it to have evolved in pieces.

We don’t want to argue the merits of these creationist arguments here. Our question this morning is different. In his 2015 Cincinnati sermon, Senator Green claimed to be an expert about the scientific weaknesses of evolutionary theory. On what grounds? Because of his work and training as a medical doctor.

It’s not much to go on, but there certainly seems to be a mini-trend involved here. Senator Green joins other prominent doctor/creationists in politics. Most obviously, Secretary Ben Carson rose to prominence as a young-earth creationist and pediatric neurosurgeon. Representative Paul Broun of Georgia, too, headed the House science committee, hated evolution, and claimed that his “scientific” education as a medical doctor had convinced him of the weaknesses of evolutionary science.

What is going on here? One might think that medical training would weed out creationist thinking. Most medical doctors, after all, study lots of biology. And, as the man said, nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution.

Again, our sample of only three prominent doctor/creationists isn’t large enough to prove anything, but it does raise the question. Why do so many of our prominent creationists come from the field of medicine?

One answer would seem to be that medical doctors can claim the prestige of science without actually doing any pure scientific research themselves. They can claim to be experts, but they really are more interested in the mechanics of biology than the driving processes.

As anthropologist David Long found in his study of undergrad bio majors, it is very easy to study biology and remain a committed young-earth creationist.

Clearly, as the case of Senator Green reminds us, simply learning more biology will not convince people out of their creationist beliefs. Just like other prominent doctor/creationists, Dr. Green’s creationism is something besides a lack of knowledge about mainstream science.